A Stroll a day Keeps Employee Turnover Away

As an employee retention speaker, I tell people the best way to ensure that you are visible is to develop a regular routine for walking around.  Twice a day is the minimum.  Take a “stroll” around first thing in the morning and late in the day at a minimum.  First thing in the morning gives you an opportunity to see if there are issues that need to be addressed, if your people need anything, or to pass along critical information.  Late in the day enables you to see if there are issues so you can adjust for tomorrow or information you need to convey that they will need for the next day.   It also gives you an opportunity to “chat” with your people in person….not online.

These “strolls” give you an opportunity to interact, to get to know your people.  They create opportunities to communicate.  People become comfortable talking with you.  As you communicate you soon learn what is important to people.  That is critical as you have performance management discussions and career growth sessions.  It is also critical to your employee retention strategies.  You will learn what these people are jazzed about doing.  That insight is invaluable.  Besides….you will actually have fun doing it!  If you don’t….you need to get out of a leadership role!!!!!

You will also get an opportunity to know your people as people.  I convey how critical this is when I am working as an employee retention trainer.  This insight is crucial in employee retention strategies, because it will enable you to notice changes in a person’s behavior…changes that indicate that something may be wrong at work.  Changes that may indicate that they are thinking of leaving!  If you sense those things….a red flag should go up something is going wrong and you need to ask questions to determine what it is.  Then take action!  You can’t do any of this if you don’t get out and take a “stroll” twice a day.

Jeff Kortes

jeff@humanassetmgt.com

Jeff speaks and conducts workshops regularly in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota and Indiana. He draws on his experiences as a human resources professional, father, coach, martial artist and U.S. Army veteran to provide thought-provoking programs that yield results.