The Job’s Boring But I Like my Co-Workers

As an employee retention speaker and employee retention author, I hear these two comments used together quite often.  It is both an indictment of employers and a compliment rolled into one.  This person will stay in the role she is in because she has worked in a hell hole where senior leadership was not only incompetent but treated people like they were garbage.  Frankly, that is the reason she left.  She got fed up and after 10 years decided to leave.  Now she is in a role where she is bored to tears, works for a good boss and likes her coworkers.  If it weren’t for her coworkers and her boss she would be looking for another job.

Her coworkers are helpful, upbeat and work together.  When she came onboard, they made her feels welcome in addition to her boss being welcoming.  It is not enough for the boss to do so, the coworkers must do so as well.  After all, you usually only deal with your boss on occasion but you deal with your coworkers all the time.  If they are jerks and difficult to get along with it makes coming in to work every day difficult.  As her and I talked, but for her coworkers, she would be thinking about looking for another job already.  I don’t want to minimize the boss because he is the one that sets the tone for the department and how people interact with each other.  To his credit, he has set the expectation that people will treat each other with respect and work in a cooperative manner.

All this being said, my colleague has decided that if her job duties are not expanded, she will not stay because she wants the challenge.  She has spoken to her manager about it and he is trying to make changes as well to the department that would help the department run better AND would give my colleague more expanded responsibilities.  For a person who wants challenges, managers have to find them for their people.  If they don’t many will reluctantly leave because needing the challenge tends to outweigh the liking of the people you work.  Usually, boredom is more powerful than liking the people around you.

Top talent can go anywhere.  The time a manager has to resolve issues is limited.  Top talent will not wait around forever even if the environment is decent.  Top talent wants more than just decent coworkers.  You can’t get away with only having one element that is important even if that element it is great coworkers.  You have to have a well-rounded employee retention plan that covers all the important aspects of retention.  Boredom is one of them!

Jeff Kortes

jeff@humanassetmgt.com

Jeff Kortes is an employee retention expert who speaks and conducts workshops regularly in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota and Indiana. He draws on his experiences as a human resources professional, father, coach, martial artist and U.S. Army veteran to provide thought-provoking programs that yield results.